Friday, January 27, 2012

The Last Time An American Imperialist Commander In Chief Visited The King Center

January 15, 2004 Should Have Set The Tone For What An American President Should Expect When He Comes To The "King Compound" In Light Of His Wanton Use Of American Military Power Against What Believe To Be The Answer To "W.W.K.D.?"  (What Would King Do?)

“If Dr. King was here today, he’d be protesting too,” said Petite Hammonds, a protester from Atlanta.




YOU CAN'T FORCE A PEOPLE TO SHOW CONSISTENCY IN THEIR PROTESTS.
YOU CAN ONLY MAKE OBSERVATIONS OF THEM AND DENOTE THEIR PRIORITIES.
Kathy Nicholas had planned to pay quiet tribute Thursday at the tomb of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. So had President Bush. The combination was anything but quiet.
Nicholas was among about 700 people who booed, chanted and beat drums near the typically placid grave site, angry that Bush was there on what would have been the slain civil rights leader’s 75th birthday.
“When I heard Bush was coming here I couldn’t believe it. I was outraged and disgusted, and I just think it’s a photo op. It’s so transparent,” said Nicholas, a flight attendant who brought a sign that read: “Mr. Bush, May Dr. King’s spirit rise up n welcome you, touch you n speak to you.”
The protesters pushed past Secret Service barricades. They pounded on the sides of three city buses parked on the street in front of King’s tomb to block them from the president’s motorcade.


Although King Center officials did not invite Bush to join their planned celebration, Mrs. King met briefly with the president.
Shortly before Bush's arrival, a line of city buses parked in front of the center, preventing Bush and the protesters from seeing each other, although the demonstrators' jeers and slogans were not muted.
Their signs indicated the protesters were drawn from a wide coalition. "War is not the Answer," "Promote Peace, Not Halliburton," "HUD Sponsors Racism," "Impeach the Liar" and "No Blood for Oil" were just a few of them.


Outside, the protesters chanted "Bush Go Home" and "Peace Not War." They carried signs protesting the war and calling for "Money For Jobs And Housing, Not War."
Before Bush's arrival for the 15-minute stop, some of the protesters had broken through barriers around the King Center, leading to two arrests, the Atlanta police said, and prompting the authorities to place the buses between the demonstrators and the president.
The White House had arranged for Bush to stop at King's resting place on a day when the president was scheduled to be in Atlanta for a fund-raising event. Sheriee Bowman, a spokeswoman for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, said that the group respected the president's right to pay tribute to King. But she suggested that the civil rights organization saw Bush's presence as politically motivated.
"We question the integrity of the timing of the move because last year at this time he took a stand against affirmative action, the Michigan case, which is part of Dr. King's legacy," she said, referring to the Supreme Court case that considered the use of race in college admissions.



President Bush's visit on Thursday to observe what would have been the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s 75th birthday isn't sitting well with area tribute organizers.
They say Bush invited himself to their party and will potentially force the cancellation of some events due to security concerns. What's more, they say, Bush will profit from a fund-raiser he will piggyback with his visit to Atlanta.
About 3:45 p.m., the president will lay a wreath at the late civil rights leader's crypt at the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site. The president announced his visit on Friday.
But the MLK March Committee, a group of area civil rights activists who worked with King, say they have worked for months on a program to honor the civil rights leader at Ebenezer Baptist Church, across the street.
"They told us that the Secret Service wanted us out of there by 2 p.m.," said the Rev. James Orange. "We are not leaving the church." The Ebenezer program from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. focuses on human rights.
A White House spokesman said the president's visit has been well-communicated with the King Center.

JANUARY 2012 - CIVIL RIGHTS PHARISEES ARE DISAPPOINTED THAT COMMANDER IN CHIEF OBAMA DID NOT APPEAR AT THE "KING DAY RITUAL", INSTEAD SENDING VALERIE JARRETT. 

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